Restless Legs Syndrome and Rheumatoid Arthritis


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Is There a Connection Between RLS and RA?

Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are two distinctive conditions, but they actually may occur together in many cases.

In the United States alone, 10 percent of the population has RLS — and a third of those people also have RA. Unfortunately the connection is not totally clear, but there is hope and you are not alone!

RLS causes sensations like throbbing, creeping, and tingling, among others, due to the fact that it’s a nervous system disorder. The sensations usually occur at night while you’re laying still.

Typically the only way to relieve these feelings is to move your legs. You will feel a strong urge to keep them moving, which will often keep you up at night and cause fatigue in the days that follow.

In addition to being painful and annoying, RLS can actually make symptoms of RA worse when you experience fatigue. This is why proper treatment is crucial, so get in touch with your doctor if you think you may be experiencing RLS.

Restless Legs Syndrome and Rheumatoid Arthritis

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NewLifeOutlook TeamNewLifeOutlook Team
Nov 15, 2016
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